MiDGT mobile application

MiDGT mobile application

MiDGT mobile application is the official name of the android application from the Dirección General de Tráfico (DGT) in Spain.

MiDGT mobile application 1

Launched in March this year it gives the user access to their driving licence, the number of points they retain on their driving licence as well as details about Spanish vehicles registered in their name.

You can update your mobile phone and email address held by the DGT and authorise the receipt of notifications from the DGT.

When you log in you will see your photo, your points summary and the vehicles you own listed further down.

In the top left corner are the three lines which opens up a menu. From here you can add your mobile phone number and email to the records that the DGT hold and also switch on or off a button to receive notifications.

Next to the welcome message and photo of the registered user is the option “Ver mi carnet”. Click here and this takes you to a copy of your Spanish driving licence.

Copy of your Spanish driving licence

MiDGT mobile application 3

Once you click “Ver mi carnet” on the DGT mobile application your driving licence appears. It will show all the details of the original plastic card that you probably have in your wallet. Your date of birth, DNI/NIE etcetera. You can click to turn the card on the MiDGT mobile application around. This shows you the list of vehicle categories you have permission to drive. The dates of when you were authorised to drive each category of vehicle and the expiry date for each category is also shown in the same format as it is on the original pink plastic card licence.

This image explains the front of the driving licence as it appears on the MiDGT mobile application. The letters and numbers next to row headed 9) are the categories of vehicles you have permission to drive.

MiDGT mobile application 4

In the top right corner you will see a blue arrow forming almost a circle. Click this icon and you are presented with the reverse side of your driving licence.

Here you have more details about the category of vehicles you have permission to drive. When you were authorised to drive them and when the category expires.

If you return to the first page we looked at, the one when you access the application then lower down you will see the list of vehicles registered in your name.

Here you can click on each one to find out more information about each one.

MiDGT mobile application

List of your Spanish vehicles

There is information on the make and model of the vehicle, what fuel it uses and the engine size (cilindrada).

You will also find the VIN / Bastidor number and the date the vehicle was first registered. Now of course, it also has the environmental rating shown.

Further down the individual vehicle page you have confirmation of whether it passed the last ITV and very usefully the date the current ITV expires.

Lower down the page are the insurance records of the vehicle and the insurance renewal date.

For each vehicle registered in your name there is a record. You can access them one by one from the front page of the MiDGT mobile application.

The DGT plan to expand the use of the application. The idea is you will be able to carry out various administrative tasks from your mobile phone. In the future, you should be able to pay relevant fees using the MiDGT mobile application, pay traffic fines, identify the driver who caused the traffic infraction if it was not you that was driving.

In a later stage they intend to enable users to include matriculation and transfer of vehicle ownership using the MiDGT mobile application.

How to download the application

The application can be downloaded using your android phone’s play store or if you are an apple user from the App Store.

To access the application you will either have to have a digital signature installed on your mobile phone or have access to the Cl@ve PIN application as part of the security measures to access the information.

To log in the first time I used the Cla@ve PIN application I already have installed on my phone. It makes it a bit cumbersome the first time but then the next time I wanted to log in I just had to use my finger print and went smoothly straight into the application.

Although the MiDGT mobile application has limited functionality at the moment, the promised further developments will make dealing with Tráfico a lot easier in the future.

One final point, for the time being we still recommend you have possession of your physical driving licence on you whilst driving.

How has driving in Spain improved in the last 40 years?

This year Spain celebrates the 40th year of its constitution and the Directorate General de Trafico (DGT) has been looking back over that period at the evolution in numbers of traffic and how road deaths have fallen.

In 1978 the new constitution for the country was approved. That same year 6,967 people died on Spanish roads.  The number fell significantly when the wearing of a helmet on a motorcycle was made legally compulsory in 1982. However, that improvement disappeared as by 1989, the worse year on record, road deaths had reached 9,344.

In 2017 the figure was down by 83% to 1,830 but the DGT is not content. It has been running a campaign for a while now with the aim of reducing the number of deaths to zero. Is it realistic? It is an honourable objective and if not possible, if the authorities are aiming for that figure then surely we will see further improvements.

Over the years a number of factors have helped reduced road deaths. The authorities made ABS braking system compulsory on cars. They set up a commission  to specifically look at road safety. Points were added to driving licences and taken away for infractions, which perhaps surprisingly only started in 2006. Tougher penalties are in place for speeding.

In 1978 there were just under 9 million vehicles on Spain’s roads. By the end of 2017, this had grown to almost 33 million. Whilst last year saw a small increase in the number of road deaths the drop of 83% over this time is still quite an achievement bearing in mind the huge increase in the fleet of vehicles on the roads.

Perhaps one factor that may have contributed to the small rise in deaths is the age of the vehicles. In 2005 the average age of vehicles on Spanish roads was just 6.7 years. In 2007 the economic crash hit Spain and it hit hard. Many people haven’t seen any real growth in their income since then and the average age of vehicles has risen to 10.8 years. Newer vehicles have better safety features. However, many ordinary motorists are not able to take advantage of those.

Speeding is still the main road traffic infraction but surprisingly not wearing a seat belt also features highly, even nowadays.

Vehicle manufacturers and Government can introduce measures and police them but ultimately we all have a responsibility to ourselves, our families and other road users to use our common sense.

Tougher law for using mobile phones in Spain

Tougher law for using mobile phones in Spain

The Government of Spain is currently looking into changing the law related to using a mobile telephone whilst driving.

It is already an offence to manually use a mobile telephone whilst driving. This will incur the withdrawal of three points from your driving licence.

However, if a draft reform of the traffic laws is passed then this offence will see the removal of six points, double the current penalty.

The reform also seeks to clarify the offence by stating that using your hands to search a device, text a message or answer a call will be an infringement of the road traffic laws.

The new law will extend to all types of devices, including navigation systems. An offence won’t be incurred where these devices can be operated without the use of your hands. Devices that give verbal instructions and that are operated by voice will be ok.

Speeding fines Spain

Car Insurnace Spain Speeding

Most people realise that speeding is dangerous and is often the cause of lives being lost on the roads of Spain. This should of course be the main reason we respect the speed limits. Additionally, speeding can be very expensive in Spain.

Speed limit and penalty point chart
Source: dgt.es

I think it is fair to say that most people have exceeded the speed limit at some stage in their driving life time. May be it was just a lack of concentration, our mind wondering or because of a hectic lifestyle. Of course no one thinks they are going to be in an accident but the penalties might just make us think again about the speed we drive at.

In Spain you start with 12 points on your licence and if you are caught committing a traffic infraction you may lose some of those points. Alternatively if you continue to drive within the law you can gain points up to a maximum of 15.

On the left of the chart are the points you will lose from your licence. On the right are the fines you will receive. At the very top is a horizontal ist of speed limits. Below is a table showing that, for example, driving at between 91 and 100 kilometres per hour in a 50 kilometre zone will mean losing 6 points off your licence and a fine of 500 euros.